First page of the storage archive.

Square peg in round hole – what to do?

Posted by is9582 on July 14, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , ,

I know the title may not represent the subject of this article exactly, but it’s sure awfully close. During my stay in Germany, I helped move some furniture into an old Bahnhof (train station in german), and we were successful with some, but not all.

Many of the old Bahnhofs were built with external stairs, as the only real means for gaining access to the upper floors. In the Bahnhof we were dealing with, these external stairs were in the form of an old castle’s spiral staircase, with the conical roof and all. For anyone who hasn’t ever dealt with a spiral staircase, and moving furniture, there are certain limiting factors. But unlike some of the more current spiral staircases, there wasn’t any open area on the sides, that we could use to let the oversized furniture hang out.

The stairwell is highlighted with a green rectangle, and a red arrow added to help find it better.

The stairwell is highlighted with a green rectangle, and a red arrow added to help find it better.

My daughter and I found a way to coax a full-size box spring for a bed, up through the circular maze, even though it initially acted as if it wouldn’t fit. When it came time for the Queen sized box spring, we knew there just wasn’t enough room, with the contortions we went through on the smaller full-size unit. We still had a go at it, just in case, but it was obviously too large. No matter what we tried, even leaning on the frame in a manner that sounded like we almost broke it in half, were we able to make it go. After the remainder of the furniture was upstairs, and got our wind back, I made a suggestion. Why don’t we just take the box spring apart, and then I can rebuild it again upstairs. My daughter did a quick search and found there was a Queen-sized unit that evidently folded in some manner, to assist fitting through smaller dimensions, but it certainly wasn’t free! The decision was made, so I grabbed all of the tools and headed back down. I’d never taken a box spring apart before, and really not even peaked under the coverings, but I figured it couldn’t be that bad. (Hmmmm)

Even with the longer days in this part of Germany (~4:15am – 10:30pm), after the decision process, we were already getting fairly late in the day. I used my heavy duty Bosch staple remover that I bought at the same time as the Gransfors Bruks axe in my earlier article, and it was sturdy enough to help pull the lighter staples used to attach the material, but the longer staples used to connect wood members were too much. Even so, we shifted away from the slow and exacting tac (read that as methodically pulling each staple around the perimeter, to release the material, and instead cutting just inside the staples), and shifted to the “let’s get this done, before any sound ordinances kick in” approach.

Bosch heavy duty staple remover, with the black handle and extra strong metal bit. Awesome!

Bosch heavy duty staple remover, with the black handle and extra strong metal bit. Awesome!

After almost all of the covering was removed, we started the de-construction process, which was basically pulling apart what we could and using a hammer to “bash” the rest apart. During this process, we tested at multiple stages to see if removing certain parts  might allow it to go through the stairwell. After the second attempt ended again in failure, I knew we had to take it down to individual boards. After we finally finished, we got everything upstairs and we all wiped out.

As some of you might be thinking, I was aware that the same issues would present themselves in the future, when it was time to move from this location. With this in mind, we found a hardware store, and I bought 125 Torx screws that were approximately 1 1/2″ long. I wanted it long enough to solidly connect two of the thickest boards (just over 3/4″ thick) used in the box springs. When initially planning for the screws, I thought 60 or so would do, but opted to double that number when at the store. I just didn’t want to come up short. To my surprise (and relief), even with this doubling of the screw count, I only had 8 unused at the end of the re-build.

While getting the screws, I bought a wireless drill/driver and a few drill bits. I made sure there was a bit that would allow me to drill a pilot hole through each board that would be the “outer” of two joined, to keep these self-biting screws from potentially biting into both pieces, and ultimately holding them apart. During the initial testing at the Bahnhof, I saw just how poorly some drill bits are made, and while I knew this on some level from using drills all of my life, I was somewhat surprised at what happened in the first hole I drilled in the real project.

Two of the boards that run across the end of the box spring, still had a strip of the thicker fabric attached, that the maker used to make the top side durable and I suppose pretty. When the drill bit exited the back of one of these boards, the bit caught in this fabric, and snapped into three pieces! I really couldn’t believe what just happened! (Reminder to always wear your safety glasses, which my polycarbonate sunglasses served the purpose!) There were times in my previous wood/metal drilling, that I’ve made a dumb mistake, and caused a bit to fail, but never anything like this. I wasn’t applying any side forces, or trying to change the entry angle, to make it a right angle or anything like that. So, with that in mind, you can imagine how cautious I was with the remaining 116 or so holes I needed to drill. Fortunately, the next larger size was still small enough so the head wouldn’t pull through the wood, when tightened.

Now let me go back to where I was going with this article. Since our deconstruction process took on a “go, go, go” attitude to meet the sound ordinance, almost all of the staples (long and short) were still in some of the boards. Some of the long staples were driven so their head was almost 1/8″ below the surface. I used a small hammer on each of the legs, to drive it out far enough, so I could grab the head with vise-grips. Even with the staple’s head now protruding, it still took a fair amount of time and effort to get each staple all the way out. The short staples used to hold down the fabric were much easier, and felt like they just jumped out, compared to the heavy-duty long-legged staples.

The staple pulling went on for a couple of days, using the spare time between all other activities, and I could see I was likely to run out of time, if I tried to get every single staple out. Plan B: I looked at all of the boards, and where they would interact with the others, and on most of them there was enough room for two screws, around the existing staples. So, for these that had enough extra room, the staples stayed, but I broke the long legs off flush with the underside of each board. If there was anything still protruding, I just gave it a quick tap with the hammer. If it happened to lift above the surface, I pulled it out, and all was good.

When I started the actual build, I placed each board in it’s position, and marked for the pilot holes I’d drill on the outside board. While marking the placement of these holes, I also visually aligned the boards so they were either square, or parallel, depending on which I referenced. I didn’t have a square, and I know I could have made one using mathematics, but the eye be pretty darned precise once trained. I also had the side benefit of the original staples’ holes, and it looked like they might have sprayed the unit with a wood sealer, after it was built. There was a very light color difference showing how things overlapped each other, but I had to remember that each board may have been in a different location, since they seemed interchangeable enough to not spend the extra time during the de-construction. When I was working with the longer boards, I lightly drove one screw at each end, to keep the intended shape, and once happy, sank them tight. Only after that, did I install any of the screws along the length. It is too easy to pull parts out of alignment, even if by just a little bit, so that the whole doesn’t look right or just won’t go together.

Box Spring partially re-built, but already very rigid and strong.

Box Spring partially re-built, but already very rigid and strong.

Each connection got two screws, and for the most part, I used my left hand as my vise. It wasn’t until fairly deep in the build that my Son-in-law asked if I wanted to use a specific tool to clamp some pieces while I drilled. This tool is somewhat like a vise-grip, but it has a jaw that can move into four positions, allowing for holding parts from thin to very thick. Doh! There were a couple of connections where the board wasn’t quite as flat as would be ideal, so I did use this “clamp” to keep things from moving. Great idea Scott!

These grips have a lower jaw that can fit into any of the four grooves, and has a wide range of holding.

These grips have a lower jaw that can fit into any of the four grooves, and has a wide range of holding.

During the de-construction, there were a couple of boards that either lost a little integrity, or bit the big one. Really the nature of the beast when trying to get something apart, that was never truly intended to come apart. One specific board, was one of the four long main frame boards, and a 1/4″ section of wood stayed under the staple after the board was removed. This board had a curve cut on each end, so the box spring didn’t have a sharp corner. After looking at it for a bit, I flipped it over, and end for end. This gave me enough solid wood at the place where it needed to connect, and we didn’t need to go looking for a piece of wood. One other is of note, and somewhat important. One of the boards that crosses from side to side, to help prevent any of the mattress from sinking down into the box spring, broke with a very light touch, at a knot in the board. Probably never should have made it into the original build, but it also may have felt sturdy enough to not matter. Well, the nature of this break was complete and all the way across the board, so there was no repairing this baby. I looked over all of the other similar pieces, to make sure they were all solid, and luckily they were. So, rather than trying to sprint about 30Km, to get one little piece of wood, I instead shifted each cross piece slightly, to keep an even spacing between each one. The spacing between each cross member grew very slightly, and it will still work solidly.

After all of the screws were installed, we again had a super stiff box spring, that will work wonderfully until it is time to move. At that point, the screws are removed, the boards are transported down the stairs to an awaiting abode, and then screw it back together. As a decision was made to leave the box spring uncovered, it will be simple to deconstruct and I believe they may just use the open space as a little bit of additional storage. Houses in Germany are notorious for lack of built-in storage, so it is space well used.

Box Spring complete and ready for action.

Box Spring complete and ready for action.

Box springs aren’t the most expensive piece around, but if you weren’t already planning to drop some extra $$, you can always do this yourselves. It certainly isn’t rocket science, but does require some focus and some work. I hope this might just help you, if you need to find a way to make your’s fit where it wasn’t meant.

Thanks as always for checking out the article and please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Lee Laird

Finally got bench where it belongs

Posted by is9582 on June 12, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve been working with my bench out towards the center of the shop, with tons of extraneous “extras”, that really always kept me from developing a storage solution that was both handy and functional. I finally made time to clear some of those “extras” from the shop space, and I am stoked! I’ve known that I wanted my bench in a certain location for a number of years, but there was always something that kept me from it. Funny how I made the time to get after this, after recovering from two major back surgeries. Seems this would have been more opportune before the injuries, but we trudge on.

Bench moved against wall, but still cluttered post move.

Bench (lousy image) moved against wall, but still cluttered post move.

Ok, this partially came about due to my drive, but there was a secondary (and really a 3rd, too) factor that also helped push me along. The hot water heater in our house is getting up in age, and we purchased one before the impending size adjustment hit. Of course we wanted to get this unit installed BEFORE the old one eroded and poured water all over the floor, but the quote our plumber gave us had a shelf-life of sorts. And one last thing was that I wanted to get it installed before going to help the kids for a couple of weeks.

Alright, so I got the bench over against the wall, so it was time to start making some updated storage, even if it was just a temp stop-gap, until I have the time to layout and build a storage cabinet for the wall. I had a partial sheet of solid-core plywood that I knew would be plenty strong to handle hand planes and most other things I might throw at it.

I decided to start off with making cleats for four of my hand planes: my #8, #62, #6 and #51. It can be a good learning lesson just going through the necessary layout and thought process related to this type of storage. On the surface, it seems like you’d just cut 8 small pieces of wood and attach them to the plywood. Done! Well, it’s not really that simple, even though it’s easily within most woodworker’s capabilities. As many of you probably know, the fact that I am severely anal can also have a pronounced impact on any of my projects.

I started off measuring the planes I planned to store, and get an idea how much space I should alot. When I started thinking about the cleats, I again took measurements to see just how much space each plane required, so they could slide under the cleat. (Note: Make sure you actually measure the thickness of both ends of the planes, as I missed this little detail. When I talk about the #62, you’ll understand!)

I had a strip of wood (3/8″ thick) that was just about the correct width (~2″) to fit between the side flange on most of the planes. I cut it up into 8 pieces, with four being a bit longer than the others. To get the space needed behind the cleats, I re-used some dense pine (also about 3/8″ thick), and cut them so they were just shy of the same width as the cleats. Each was glued to the back of a cleat, with some 5-minute epoxy, which sets strong enough for the initial work and will only get stronger.

I pre-drilled the holes where the screws would pass, even though I planned to use some that do not require a hole. I just didn’t want to take the chance that the bite of the screw might cause a split or crack. I need these to be strong enough to keep my tools safe.

I started placing the bottom cleats, working from the outside edge, towards the center. To get the bottom of the cleats to all reasonably line up, I placed a wooden spacer under the bottom of each cleat, before driving the screws home. I placed each plane onto it’s bottom cleat, to see how much space I wanted to leave between it and it’s neighbor(s).

Initial attempt of four bottom cleats.

Initial attempt of four bottom cleats.

After I had all four of the bottom cleats in place, I placed a couple of planes onto their cleats, to find the best placement of the upper cleats. It turned out with the lengths of the bottom cleats, there wasn’t any way to make the plane hold, and also release. It only took a moment to realize I had the cleats reversed. The bottom cleats don’t require a great deal of depth, and the upper must have more travel than is needed to disengage the lower. So, off with all four of the “bottom” cleats, and I repeated the process with the old “upper” cleats, only at the bottom. Jeez!

#62 and #6 on original bottom cleats.

#62 and #6 on original bottom cleats.

Ok, lets pick back up, with the #8 sitting on it’s bottom cleat. I again moved the upper cleat until it would easily restrain the plane, but also allow for removal. The #8 and #6 were each very easy. When I came to my #62, some major adjustments were needed. With the adjustability of the mouth, on the #62, there is very little lip on the toe, to grasp and potentially move to release the plane. I drew a section of the cleat’s center, that I’d remove, so the toe section could easily move enough to make this work. To remove the wood, it was two straight cuts down the length with my Lie-Nielsen dovetail saw, and follow that with my Knew Concepts fret saw across at the base of the cut.

Top cleat for #62, with first cut at red arrow.

Top cleat for #62, with first cut at red arrow.

Ok, so I attached the upper cleat for the #62, and when I went to test the plane, it wouldn’t fit under the cleat. At first I wondered what might have happened, but when I looked at the plane, it was the old palm to the forehead. Dang it, I hadn’t measured the thickness of the toe section, and with the moving parts, it is quite a bit thicker than the sole at the rear of the plane. I cut another small piece of pine, planed it down to remove some of it’s thickness. I glued this piece to the already existing offset, and after the glue set, drilled through the full thickness, using the original holes as guides. (Oh, and yes, I used a 1/4″ longer screw for this cleat.) I reattached the upper cleat and it worked nicely.

#62 with it's adjusted top cleat, along with #8 and #6 in place.

#62 with it’s adjusted top cleat (top middle), along with #8 and #6 in place.

The #51 was a bit different, as it doesn’t have a centralized space between two side rails, so I took this into account. I cut and planed a thin strip of wood, that I could use to prevent this plane from contacting (or being contacted) by the #6 next to it. This strip of wood also acts to retain the #51, as it contacts the two cleats on the plane’s right edge, since there is no rail on this edge. With the strip in place, it was obvious the bottom cleat was still a bit too long, so I removed the excess with a sharp Japanese chisel.

Marking how much wood to remove, for the #51 to work nicely.

Marking how much wood to remove, with my Glen-Drake Tite-Mark, for the #51 to work nicely.

With this quick modification, it was easy to place the upper cleat and secure it, so the plane was retained and also removable. Whew!

All four planes, #8, #62, #6 & #51 functioning well.

All four planes, #8, #62, #6 & #51 functioning well.

I realize this is just four planes, but it was a good mental workout, to deal with a couple of oddities. I haven’t yet made holding locations for my smaller planes, like the 4 1/2, 3, block planes or shoulder planes. These will come, as well as some additional chisels that aren’t already on the back of my bench, and additional saws. If nothing else, this will give quick access to these tools, and limit some of the shaving/saw dust exposure, they once had under neath the bench’s top.

This is a great dry-run for an upcoming tool chest for the wall, as the layout of the tools and ways of handling holding is something that very subjective and has the potential to always change. I will likely add at least a few more tools, prior to securely mounting the storage unit to the wall above my bench. I’m really looking forward to having the tools at the ready, without the work on the bench covering them in shavings.

I hope this might be useful to those that have never tried to create this type of storage before, and maybe add to what others have currently. Thank you as always, for taking the time to come check out my blog.

 

Lee Laird