First page of the Japanese archive.

How I sharpen my carving knives

Posted by is9582 on September 16, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , ,

In one of my previous articles, I briefly touched on sharpening this type knife, but I wanted to get into greater detail so others can replicate this process, if they desire.

 

After shaping the blade with different tools, it looks like a knife in form, but is still just as thick at what will be the cutting edge, as it is at the spine. At this point I head to my Baldor 1725 rpm grinder and remove material on both sides of the blade, as opposed to a knife that only has a bevel on one side, while the other side stays flat.

 

When it comes off of the grinder, it can cut you if you were to run your finger along the blade, but it is not a useful sharp, in my opinion. The grinding wheel is round, and as the side of the blade has metal removed by the wheel, the shape is called a hollow grind. If you can imagine if you were to take a block of clay and press it against a static grinding wheel, when you pull it away you’d see a curved surface. This is ultimately what happens as you present the knife to the grinder, even though it takes more time to take on this shape, as the wheels must gradually abrade away the metal. Sorry if this part is getting too deep, as I just want to make sure you understand the shape of the knife’s cutting edge. On to the “good” part.

 

With the hollow grind shape, when you want to sharpen the cutting edge, the base of the bevel works with you to make it easier to know you are working at the correct angle. When you put a flat surface (similar to a ruler) up against the bevel, you can feel when both the cutting edge and base of the bevel are both touching. If you had a flat bevel or a convex bevel from the base to the cutting edge, it can be very difficult to actually feel that you are in correct alignment, especially when the bevel is very small.

 

This is a recent blade I made, and it is already sharpened, and you can see the polished tracks at the cutting edge and the base of the bevel.

This is a recent blade I made, and it is already sharpened, and you can see the polished tracks at the cutting edge and the base of the bevel.

 

This is the Dia-Fold diamond hone, and the handles swing so they close around the hone, or open to provide a handle.

This is the Dia-Fold diamond hone, and the handles swing so they close around the hone, or open to provide a handle.

 

When I begin to sharpen, immediately after grinding, I use my Dia-Fold diamond sharpening hone.  I’ve owned this for 20+ years, and it started out as a Coarse hone, but over the years the diamonds have worn somewhat, and I believe it is now more in the Fine range of grits. If I had to try to pin down a specific grit, I’d see it as similar to a 1000-grit stone. I hold the blade in one hand and the Dia-Fold in the other, and feel for the hone to touch the two high areas, the cutting edge and the base of the bevel. With it correctly in position, I slide it down the knife until I reach the end of the cutting surface. I try to keep it consistent, by working each side in an alternating pattern, but you can also just work each side the same number of strokes, which will provide a similar result. When the knife comes off of the grinding wheel, I can tell when it is finished by the burr along one side of the cutting edge. This burr can be fairly significant from the grinder, so besides working with the first hone until both sides show signs of the grit all the way to the cutting edge, you also work until the burr is either removed, or diminished in size. At this point, I move to the next stage.

 

Japanese water stones in 4000-grit and 8000-grit, along the small water bowl I use with them.

Japanese water stones in 4000-grit and 8000-grit, along the small water bowl I use with them.

 

The 4000-grit Japanese water stone is used next, and they are best when used with water, as that allows the metal it removes to float off of the stone, rather than imbedding, even though it still builds up over time. If you worked the previous hone until you couldn’t feel a burr on either side of the blade, you just work with this stone until you see the change in the scratches on the cutting edge. It should change to a dull grey, with no real obvious scratch marks. When consistent on both sides of the blade, you’re ready to move on.

 

The two water stones resting in the small bowl, as I regularly use them, just missing the water.

The two water stones resting in the small bowl, as I regularly use them, just missing the water.

 

Next up is the 8000-grit Japanese water stone, and the procedure is exactly the same as the last, but I use a little less pressure as these stones can be more delicate than the 4000-grit. You still need to use water as it’s lubricant, and this time you’ll look for a nicely polished cutting edge. When both sides are complete its on to the last stage.

 

Tormek honing compound in the yellow tube. It is applied to the top section of the wood (white area) and the two black stripes are from contacting the cutting edge and bevel base at the same time.

Tormek honing compound in the yellow tube. It is applied to the top section of the wood (white area) and the two black stripes are from contacting the cutting edge and bevel base at the same time.

 

I use a honing paste that came with my Tormek T-7 sharpening system, and was included to apply on a leather covered wheel, for final honing. I’ve found I like to use this compound on a small piece of wood, that is similar in size to the Dia-Fold’s honing section. It is comfortable to hold and present to the blade, in a similar fashion. Apply the compound either directly to the wood, or put a small dab on your finger, and smear it onto the wood so there is a very thin layer in the area you plan to contact the blade. If it is too viscous, you can spray the work area of the wood with a very small amount of WD-40, which will allow it to spread easier.

 

Three potential pieces to use with the Tormek honing compound. The middle one is what I've used for the last year. Far right is one I planed and tested today; far left is a good candidate for the future.

Three potential pieces to use with the Tormek honing compound. The middle one is what I’ve used for the last year. Far right is one I planed and tested today; far left is a good candidate for the future.

 

After working both sides of the blade, and seeing they have a highly polished cutting edge, you are working sharp. I take a paper towel, or another sort of rag, and extremely carefully remove any excess compound that has transferred to the blade. The low area in the hollow grind is especially noticeable for catching the compound. When you do this the first time, make sure you start towards the thicker part of the blade, and move out past the cutting edge. Do not move back towards the blade in the same manner or you will likely cut yourself. Just raise up away from the blade and circle back down to hit another area. After you’ve gotten more comfortable, you might do as I will, and “pinch” the blade while removing the compound remnants. If you do not feel totally confidant in this, just stick to the original method, as it is not important to go any faster.

After using the knife to carve wood, you will likely come to a point where it doesn’t seem to cut quite as well. As long as you haven’t hit any nails, or staples in the wood, you can probably get away with just re-doing the Tormek compound process, to refreshen the blade. If this doesn’t seem to do the job, you can go back as far as you deem necessary, potentially all the way to the Dia-Fold. If you touch-up the blade regularly, rather than waiting until it is quite obvious the cut is not as good, you may find the Tormek compound is all you need to use to retain a very sharp knife for a long time.

As time passes, and the knife honed over and over, the hollow grind shape will slowly disappear. This will likely require you to change your process slightly, as the reference “feel” of the hollow grind will no longer be there to guide you. At this point I apply black sharpie to the bevel of the knife, and pay close attention while I work, to see when I am removing the black from the full bevel. I lock my wrist at that angle, and work until I have a consistent scratch pattern again. All of the other steps are the same, except you may need to use the sharpie for each stage of honing.

I hope this, along with the included videos below help all the owners of my knives to continue carving for years to come. Please don’t hesitate to let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 


 

 


Lee Laird

Highland Woodworking - Fine Tools Since 1978

 

Organizing some chisels

Posted by is9582 on December 12, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , ,

As I’ve mentioned at earlier times, I love chisels, which translates into quantity. I’ve been working to plane some more slabs of the Soft Maple, for my workbench top rebuild, and some of my chisels weren’t close at hand in a functional manner, but still showing their presence, if you know what I mean.

I had a couple of White Oak boards that I’d pulled for another potential project, but one of them really didn’t match up visually or structurally, so I decided to make a chisel hanger. While I was visualizing the placement of the selected chisels, I noticed three of them would be too tall, to hang on the intended location of the rack. Rather than re-develop my plans for the large rack, I decided I’d just make a smaller rack, that would live on the plane/spoke shave board I installed on the wall earlier.

Rack for three longer chisels, before any drilling or cutting.

Rack for three longer chisels, before any drilling or cutting.

I laid out my plans on the board and headed over to my band saw. A couple of quick cuts later and it was back to the bench. I planed all of the show surfaces and edges, as there really isn’t any reason in my book to leave the wood with the powered planer marks, since its easy and doesn’t take much time to accomplish.

On the large version, the second edge of the backer board caught my eye, as it just didn’t look even close to square. Sure enough, it was crazy how far out the edge really was off. I took my old Stanley No. 6, that I’d just recently sharpened, as it has a fair amount of camber that I prefer when I need to take a decent amount of wood off relatively quickly. I was just going through my planing routine when I thought I should record a short video discussing wispy vs. full-bodied shavings. Everyone loves to dial in that sub-thou shaving that almost floats away, and that can be exactly what is needed, when working to get the perfect finish, but when you have almost an extra 1/8″ of wood at one end of a board, you don’t want to take 250 passes (based on a 1/2-thou shaving, and 1/8″ = .125″) with your plane to get the wood off. I had a saw close at hand, but decided since it ramped up from almost nothing at one end, to 1/8″, I’d rather use my coarsely set No. 6. Feel free to saw if that is more enjoyable to you.

 

Oak backer board (red arrows), for larger rack.

Oak backer board (red arrows), for larger rack.

As I moved onto final placement for the chisels that would live in this rack, I brought the actual chisels to the workpiece. Sure I could measure the size of the neck of the chisel, and the socket, but the best method is to lay the actual pieces out, where they will reside. This really cuts down on math errors, and provides a true representation, so you can shift pieces around if needed, or perhaps add a piece as I did with the Auriou Model Maker’s Rasp at the far right.

Actual chisels and rasp that will live on this future rack (red arrows pointing to rack board).

Actual chisels and rasp that will live on this future rack (red arrows pointing to rack board).

I have some other things taking my focus currently, so this was the end of my shop time for now. I’ll get back to drilling and cutting and attaching in the near future.

Thanks for stopping by and let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Lee Laird

 

Barr Chisel set and leather roll

Posted by is9582 on July 22, 2012 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ll start this entry by just saying it out loud, “I love chisels”! There, now no one will ever mistake why I have so many from different makers. Haha. I ordered the four piece chisel set (1/4″, 1/2″, 3/4″, 1″) from Highland Woodworking and with the length of time it took to ship from Barr, […]

Fujihiro Japanese chisel, and a slick

Posted by is9582 on June 8, 2012 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I thought I’d show some relatively decently priced Japanese chisels, and share an experience. One of my friends, Jameel Abraham from Benchcrafted, shared with me his good results using Fujihiro Japanese chisels. Jameel was pleasantly surprised at how well these chisels held their edge, even when working American hardwoods. Many of the Japanese woodworkers from […]

Sharpening – Do I need to go to 30,000 grit?

Posted by is9582 on March 2, 2012 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Like many of you, I sharpen on a very regular basis. I’ve tried most of the different sharpening media that is presently available, along with some that are not so readily found any longer. I’ll share some of the results, and hopefully answer the title question. When I first got into woodworking, I purchased three […]