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Older Hock iron improves Bailey immensely

Posted by is9582 on August 21, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , ,

A couple of weeks ago I was going through some stuff in my shop and I found an older style Hock iron (O-1 steel) that I purchased around 1990. I was still really green relating to hand planes at that point, but I knew I wanted to learn how to both sharpen well and setup a plane to work like I’d seen from some experienced guys. I hadn’t ever used any of the Hock tools before, at the time when I purchased the iron, but there was something about their products that led me to believe it was a good buy. Boy, I was a good judge of character (at least about the Hock tools, lol)!

Ok, fast forward some 26 years later and I was completely surprised that I still had that iron. For some reason I thought I’d sold one of my old planes, with that iron in it, and that it was long gone! What a nice surprise it was still around.

I checked the edge on the Hock iron and it wasn’t even close to being sharp, so I used my usual sharpening techniques, with my 1000-grit Shapton Glass-stone and my 8000-grit Norton water-stone. A couple of minutes later (O-1 is one of the fastest steels to sharpen, yet this iron holds it’s edge a long time) it was razor sharp, and ready to take it’s rightful place in my oldest Bailey #3 hand plane.

 

Hock iron installed in old Bailey #3 hand plane, with the iron that came with the plane sitting just to the left.

Hock iron installed in old Bailey #3 hand plane, with the iron that came with the plane sitting just to the left.

 

The iron that I’ve had in the old Bailey was from 1892, and was a laminated piece. It always held an edge extremely well, which satisfied me greatly. After swapping the old Stanley iron for this much younger, but older-styled Hock iron, I of course had to test the replacement and see how it compared.

 

Closeup of the original laminated iron that came with my Bailey #3, showing 1892 at the top.

Closeup of the original laminated iron that came with my Bailey #3, showing 1892 at the top.

 

Old Bailey #3, focused in on the dates behind the frog, which are in 1902.

Old Bailey #3, focused in on the dates behind the frog, which are in 1902.

 

In the last 26 years, I’ve made a number of wooden hand planes, and purchased all of their irons from Hock. Each of these thicker irons performed exceptionally well, but I wasn’t sure if I was going to notice much of a difference between the two irons for my #3.  I took some shavings on a number of different boards, from hard Maple, Purple Heart, Cherry, Oak… and I was truly amazed at the superior surface the Hock iron provided.

I was totally blown away! I’ve always thought the old laminated Stanley irons were as good or better than anything else out there, but it is obvious my perception was a bit off.

I felt the need to share my results with anyone who might be interested in reading it, so others could also benefit from my experiment. Of course, this was not conducted in a true scientific environment, or using scientific protocols, nor does it indicate all others will get the same results as I did. Even though the new products Hock is currently making may be slightly different than the older version I posses, Hock’s quality control is good, and will still present you with an equally high quality O-1 iron.

You can check out quite a few of the Hock lineup of irons and other tools, if you click on the Highland Woodworking link on my page.

Thank you for stopping by to check out this article. I hope this information is beneficial. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 

Lee Laird

Twitter @LeeLairdWW

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