First page of the Germany archive.

Germany – return to Trier; dig a bit deeper

Posted by is9582 on July 2, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , ,

Today we decided to head back to Trier on the train, again purchasing a full-day pass, which allows 1-5 family members to travel on the train, as many times during that period as needed/liked. On our first trip to explore Trier, there was a lot going on at their festival even though it wasn’t yet at it’s peak, and we ended up spending the majority of our time in that vicinity. This was until we (or more correctly, I) ran out of steam, and we headed back home, knowing we could use our train tickets to ride back again later. Other things ended up vying for our time that evening, but we still easily got our money’s worth on our ticket, just with the single trip.

On this second Trier adventure, we headed off in a completely different direction, and almost immediately came across a few churches, with St. Paulin in the process of renovation, and a beautiful cemetery directly behind St. Paulin. I can understand if anyone thinks it odd to identify a cemetery as beautiful, but there was something about the layout and the obvious careful attention the families give.

St. Maximin's church.

St. Maximin’s church.

 

 

St. Paulin's church, under repair.

St. Paulin’s church, under repair.

 

As we were examining the cemetery grounds, we noticed a large number of plastic plant waterers, each separately locked to a large metal frame. We saw at least three of the frames throughout the grounds, each having a water spigot within a foot or two , and all had waterers locked to the frames. We saw this as indicating the plastic waterers stayed on-site continuously, making it easier for any family member or friend that wanted to go water the flowers. Seems like a very smart plan.

 

Waterers all locked up to the metal frame by the water fountain.

Waterers all locked up to the metal frame by the water fountain.

 

As we passed St. Paulin, and were about to wander again, we came across a statue for St. Paulinus.

 

St. Paulinus statue.

St. Paulinus statue.

 

Plaque of information for St. Paulinus, below his statue.

Plaque of information for St. Paulinus, below his statue.

 

As we didn’t have a defined route or list of sights we specifically wanted to visit on this trip, we headed towards the West, or basically perpendicular to the train tracks. This at least made sure we didn’t cross our previous path, until we turned back to the South. When we got to PaulinStrassa, it seemed like a very active cross-street, so we headed South and immediately saw cool shop on the corner. This shop had some cameras that looked very old, as well as other electronic gear that had some age on it, as well as other old tools. These items were in the window, so it was unclear if the shop was primarily dealing with cameras and film, or what exactly. As I love tools and old stuff, this was a super cool find.

 

Old cameras in store window.

Old cameras in store window.

 

As we made our way down the street, there were a number of bakeries, as well as all sorts of stuff. We decided to stop at a store called Viking Adventures, that had all sorts of clothing, backpacks, shoes and just about anything else you might want along on a trek all the way to full-on camping. They had some really nice gear, but as expected, it was pricy. This was no different than anywhere else, as good quality almost always demands high prices.

As we made our way further down the street, it just so happened to lead directly to the entrance of the Porta Nigra, where the festival entrance had been earlier. I took the opportunity to take another photo of the front, without the extra tenting blocking the view.

 

Front view of Porta Nigra.

Front view of Porta Nigra.

It was getting pretty toasty, as the temperature was up in the high 80s, so we decided to head back to the train station. Since we smartly (in my humble opinion) purchased the family all-day train tickets, we went back home to eat some lunch. This saved us some money, compared to grabbing something to eat in Trier, as well as giving us the chance to get off of our feet and out of the sun for a while.

Later, we took the train back to Trier, to re-visit some areas, including the Porta Nigra. This time I took the opportunity to go inside the structure, on the ground floor, and look it over closely. While inside, I got to see the heavy-duty metal (looks like wrought iron) pins, on which very large doors were hung. I had no way of knowing whether these were original to the structure, or added at a later time. Either way, they looked like they once supported something massive.

From the inside you could also see the arched openings facing the center, and up above the highest floor, there was a recessed area that looked like it may have originally held a statue or figurine of some sort. Oh, if the walls could talk.

 

Inside upper area of the Porta Nigra.

Inside upper area of the Porta Nigra.

 

Lower portion of same wall, in the Porta Nigra.

Lower portion of same wall, in the Porta Nigra.

 

Close up of upper-most wall, focusing somewhat on the empty recess.

Close up of upper-most wall, focusing somewhat on the empty recess.

 

Three huge gate pins, which each side of each opening had. Looks like they are made of wrought iron.

Three huge gate pins, which each side of each opening had. Looks like they are made of wrought iron.

 

Before we left, I slipped out behind the structure, to take a couple of unobscured photos. Now that the large stage for one of the festival’s bands was gone, I could capture everything.

 

Rear view of the Porta Nigra.

Rear view of the Porta Nigra.

 

As we started making our way back to the train station again, we stopped at the Baldwin statue (Balduin von Trier), so I could get some up close and personal. The first visit to Trier, I snapped a quick photo of this statue, from across the street. There were all sorts of trees, signs and people that left me wanting for more. Up close, I noticed there were small panels at each 90-degree section of the pedestal, with those that did not face the same as the statue, having names of others. Upon some further investigation on Google (thanks Cottie), more of the statue’s puzzle seemed to open. Baldwin was Archbishop-Elector of Trier, 1307-1554; his brother Heinrich (A.K.A. Henry) VII (shown on one of the other three panels was King of Germany from 1308 and the Holy Roman Emperor from 1312; elector Peter von Aspelt (on one of the remaining panels) was Archbishop of Mainz from 1306 – 1320 and was involved in the appointment of Baldwin as elector of Trier; Dante Allighieri was on the remaining panel, and was a partisan of Henry VII. This statue was made by sculptor Ferdinand Freiherr von Miller, at some point in time prior to 1929.

 

Baldwin (A.K.A. Baldvin or Balduin) statue.

Baldwin (A.K.A. Baldvin or Balduin) statue.

 

Aspelt panel, on the lower pedistal of the Balwin statue.

Aspelt panel, on the lower pedestal of the Balwin statue.

 

Dante, second panel on Baldwin statue.

Dante, second panel on Baldwin statue.

 

Heinrich, last panel on Baldwin statue.

Heinrich, last panel on Baldwin statue.

 

While I really enjoy seeing new sites, there is just something about learning the historic background of the most interesting ones. Thank you as always, for stopping by to check out the article, and please let me know if you have questions or comments.

 

Lee Laird

Germany – some time in Trier

Posted by is9582 on June 28, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , ,

Yesterday, we rode a train into Trier and hung out at a yearly festival that was occurring. We were very lucky to have such wonderful weather, as it was mostly sunny and the temperature was comfortable.

Before making it to the festival area, we saw some cool sites, including some old statues and of course old buildings. On our walk to the festival area, there were parking spots along the street, that were inset between the trees. So, for example, a couple of large trees, then a car or two, then more trees, and repeat. Very interesting for sure, and completely different than many parts of the States.

Statue along the street leading to the festival.

Statue along the street leading to the festival.

The last site we saw before entering into the festival, was the “Porta Nigra”, which is touted as the largest Roman City gate, north of the Alps. They have it dated to 200 A.D.

Front of the Roman gate.

Front of the Roman gate.

 

Closeup of one section of the Roman gate, from the front side.

Closeup of one section of the Roman gate, from the front side.

 

Rear of the Roman gate, unfortunately with a festival band stage obscuring the lower section.

Rear of the Roman gate, unfortunately with a festival band stage obscuring the lower section.

 

Since we got to Trier before 11a.m., the festival activities, like the bands on the stages, were mostly just messing around with sound-check and running through final dialing-in. Even with the early time-frame, there were still a decent amount of people walking around the festival area, but luckily it didn’t require pressing through the bodies at this point.

We stopped and grabbed a couple of “sausage links on brotchen”, at a stand that had a really nice guy that could transition into English. Also got an order of fries with Aioli sauce, which adds a nice touch to the flavor. From our stop at a statue, we made our way through an alley-type way, and saw a cool church that was tucked away.

Church tucked away from main shopping path.

Church tucked away from main shopping path.

 

Church taken from laying on the ground (my daughter, not me).

Church taken from laying on the ground (my daughter, not me).

 

Funny, but on the way back through the “mall” the second time, I saw a pretty fountain that eluded my eye the first time around.

Interesting fountain in the main section of the shopping area.

Interesting fountain in the main section of the shopping area.

There were lots of interesting architecture and gold coloration used on some of the ornamentation that really made it stand out.

Shops along festival site with gold accents on architecture.

Shops along festival site with gold accents on architecture.

 

Closeup of gold accents.

Closeup of gold accents.

 

Interesting roof area embellishments.

Interesting roof area embellishments.

 

Most interesting McDonald's I've ever seen.

Most interesting McDonald’s I’ve ever seen.

 

Interesting curved structure a few blocks off of the festival area.

Interesting curved structure a few blocks off of the festival area.

 

On our exit from the festival area, we happened to look to the West and saw a castle up on the hill, that is actually in Luxembourg. I had no idea at that time, that we were actually that close to the border.

Standing at the Roman gate, you can just see a castle at the top of the hill, that is Luxembourg.

Standing at the Roman gate, you can just see a castle at the top of the hill, that is Luxembourg.

All in all, we had a really good time and I got some great exercise during the process. It was cool to see the little villages in between Trier and our destination, which most had a “Bahnhof” (train station), and interestingly enough, most seemed to have the same stone-work and idea, even if they weren’t all the same size or exact layout.

If you are ever in the Western part of Germany, and are looking for some good sight-seeing, check out Trier. There are many sights we had to put off for another time, as my battery was running on empty.

Thanks as always for checking out the articles, and please do let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 

Lee Laird

Checking out Germany

Posted by is9582 on June 25, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , ,

I don’t have enough time to write about this subject tonight, but I’ll see if I can make some time in the next couple of days. I thought I’d toss out one photo I took today, of a post/beam that is inside my Daughter and her husband’s “house”, which has a ton of character and […]

Spring cleaning? You too?

Posted by is9582 on May 8, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , ,

I’ve been meaning to go through the iffy wood in my shop, to “honestly” assess it’s future use. This can be such a hard process, as “this little piece could probably be used as a shim, or at least a toothpick”. Have you ever had those thoughts, and found a way to justify wood that […]

Had to help a friend

Posted by is9582 on April 10, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , ,

Ok, so the title of this article sounds like I’m being all noble and stuff, right?? Well, that is how I try to live my life, but you may think it is a bit misleading, after reading the next part. A great friend offered some nice wood, in different species, to me the other day. […]