First page of the contact cement archive.

Leather Chisel Pliers – my way

Posted by is9582 on April 18, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , ,

I recently got a pair of Hand Chisel Pliers (mentioned in my previous post here) from my local Tandy store, as I was experiencing some negative issues when trying to pierce two or more layers of leather, from one side. This tool looks like it would be one of the most simple tools to use, and while the actual functional aspect is quite easy, I learned really quick there are some nuances everyone should know.

 

Here are the actual Hand Chisel Pliers alongside of their packaging.

Here are the actual Hand Chisel Pliers alongside of their packaging.

 

If you were to ask me if I could use a set of pliers, before knowing about these chisel pliers, I would have laughed so hard that I’d truly roll on the floor. The idea that I might not know how to use pliers would have seemed so absurd! So this set can take a little bit to get used to, especially if you are someone that is detail oriented.

When I got home with the Chisel Pliers, I was ready to tackle the world, and nothing could cause the rare outlier of holes that was out of line with the masses (or almost missed the edge of the leather completely, jeez!). I’ll give you a brief run-down on my initial plan of action, and then the solution to get the best results.

Most of my work is using two layers of leather, although I have added a third layer on certain pieces. This work-flow will handle either. After I’ve cut my leather into the desired shapes, I mark a line along the edge where I will punch, so my results are as consistent as possible. I use the actual 4-toothed thonging chisel to lightly cut into the leather, creating my layout, by pressing the sharp chisel teeth gently into the leather. I follow this using my Japanese hammer to drive this same chisel deep enough so the teeth just come out the other side of the leather. I shift to my single-toothed chisel as design and shape require. After all of the stitching holes are complete on the first side, I apply contact cement to the inside mating surfaces of both pieces of leather (assuming just two layers on this example), and leave them to dry for about 25 minutes. When this time has elapsed, I carefully align the two pieces of leather, and press the areas that received contact cement, bonding them together. It is now time for the Chisel Pliers.

On my first piece, I put one of the plier’s teeth into one of the existing holes from my chisel, and squeezed the handles together. How much easier could it get, right? Well, I did this on four or five holes, since I “knew” this was so simple. Then I flipped the piece over to see my handy work. OMG! I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. It looked all snaggle-toothed, with one hole above my intended line, and the next below, and one really close to another. Wow, talk about brought back to reality! I grabbed a scrap piece of leather, from an earlier piece, that was already two layers thick. I laid out my stitching line on both sides, and then tried to make the chisel teeth from the pliers, hit the line on both sides. After a couple of tries I found something that worked. (I repeated this test, but on a single layer of leather, to show the difference.)

 

Test scrap piece of leather, that I've created my stitching line, holes with the thonging chisel, and labeled two sections. The

Test scrap piece of leather, that I’ve created my stitching line, holes with the thonging chisel, and labeled two sections. The “A” section is the first three holes from the far left and the “B” section the next three after those in “A”.

 

This is the opposite side of the test piece, with

This is the opposite side of the test piece, with “A” showing what can happen if not keeping the plier’s head level, and “B” doing just that. (Sorry the image isn’t easier to see)

 

If I place one of the plier’s chisels into the pre-chiseled hole (on the first side), and sight along the top of the Chisel Plier’s head so it is in line with my stitching line, the rear chisel hits my line or so close that after stitching it is irrelevant. At first it may feel like this is adding a lot of extra time to the work, but after a couple of pieces, I noticed it has become automatic and flows at least as quickly as before, with better no damage to either side’s holes. (The results aspect is related to the thonging chisel not needing to cut as deep, and the damage from the chisel’s shoulders when using the multiple-head thonging chisel.)

On two-layer pieces, I don’t usually need to follow behind the Chisel Plier’s cut on the rear piece with my single-toothed chisel. This tool was extremely sharp out of the packaging, and required no additional sharpening or honing, and as it arrived, cut the leather as though it was butter; And this is with very minimal squeezing pressure on the handles. When I have 3-layer pieces, I still create the holes on the first side, glue up and then use the Chisel Pliers to generate the rear hole/alignment. I follow up with my single-toothed chisel, to connect the two outside holes, and as long as it is sharp, it only requires a gentle tap. Even though you’ve already created the alignment with the earlier process, you can potentially drive the chisel in a position that isn’t in alignment, and cut through at another position on the first side. Just try to be light-handed at first, and pay attention to how you hold the chisel and it’s alignment.

These Hand Chisel Pliers are a great addition for my work, since everything I make is hand-stitched. You might want to get yourself a pair if you’ve experienced any of the random error holes like I did, which can quickly cause a super leather piece to diminish in worth, or even kick it to the discard pile!

I hope this will help others to better use this type of tool, or perhaps give one a try, if you haven’t already. Thanks for stopping by to check out my article. As always, please let me know if you have any questions or comment. You can also check out my other social sites, and reach me at them, too.

Lee Laird

@LeeLairdWW on Twitter

@LeeLairdWoodworking on InstaGram

 

Saw vise update

Posted by is9582 on March 22, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I made my version of a saw vise with which to sharpen my hand saws, a little over a year ago. I’d picked some oak out of my “shorts” bin, that I could use to make the heads for the front and back legs of the vise. A couple of weeks ago I was in the middle of sharpening an old Disston back saw, and the vise wasn’t holding as securely, and while I was performing some work on it, the head split into two pieces. I really wanted to get it back into action, so I could finish sharpening the old saw.

 

The old front leg/head broken with a super glue bottle to help see.

The old front leg/head broken with a super glue bottle to help see.

 

The piece that broke was actually just over 1″ thick, so this time around I decided I’d go more with current convention and re-make it with some 8/4 Maple. While I was at it, I’d noticed my original design needed some revision, as it didn’t accept smaller saws (like a dovetail saw) very well. To hold the blade high enough to sharpen, the handle and part of the blade had to slide just outside an end of the vise, leading to extra vibrations and chatter with the file.

After creating my new pattern, I traced it onto my workpiece. Just before going over to the band saw, I remembered I’d planned to remove 1/4″ from the body of the work piece, so the top edge would grip the saw while leaving room for back saws. I decided to go a different route, and I cut another piece of Maple that was 1″Wide x 1/4″Deep x 18″Long. I glued and clamped this along the top edge of my main work piece, which seemed much more efficient than removing the waste material. (*Note: After completing this replacement head, I ran into a complication, but still found a way to make it work.)

 

1/4

1/4″ Lip glued and clamped to head.

 

While the glue was curing, I took the leg of my vise, from which part of the head had broken. I planned to re-use the leg, so I scored all along the joint line, between the head and the leg. I took a sharp chisel and made a little trough in the head material, where I wanted my hand saw to cut, so I wouldn’t damage the mating area of the leg.

 

I scored along the joint prior to sawing.

I scored along the joint prior to sawing.

 

Lie-Nielsen Crosscut saw part of the way through.

Lie-Nielsen Crosscut saw part of the way through.

 

End of the leg, where it mated with the broken head. Signs of the previous Dominos are evident.

End of the leg, where it mated with the broken head. Signs of the previous Dominos are evident.

 

I’d used my Festool Domino to join each head to it’s respective leg, with a couple of dominos on each one. This made it very easy to replace the head. (*Note: Even if it originally had a full tenon running up into the head, you could still saw the head off, and use the Domino to attach a replacement head). After I hand sawed (see above) so the remaining portion of the old head was separate from the leg, I just needed to pare away a few slivers of wood that were left behind. Now we are just waiting on the glue to cure.

 

Lip glued solidly and head shaped.

Lip glued solidly and head shaped.

 

With the lip solidly in place (photo above), I retraced my design onto my Maple, and I was off to the band saw. A few minutes later and I had a decent looking head, even though I still needed to clean up the sawn surface. I used my Auriou rasps to smooth out the curved surfaces and followed them with some sandpaper. The rear of the vise head needs some bevels, to allow your hands to get up close to a saw that you’re sharpening, which I created with my old Stanley #6. This plane has the right balance in it is just the right size, the weight isn’t too heavy, and it’s iron seem to cut forever, even if it is set for a fairly thick shaving. This combination lets me remove a decent amount of wood fairly quickly, while also being easy to control. Many shavings later and the shaping was complete!

 

This is the non-clamping side of the head, with the completed bevels.

This is the non-clamping side of the head, with the completed bevels.

 

I lined the original leg up against the new head, with the two surfaces that would mate, and made a couple of lines across the joint. I’ll use these with the Domino, so everything aligns when it is assembled. If you have two pieces of unlike thickness, make sure you make these marks on the surface you wish to align on the parts, as this ends up the reference surface. When I went to use the Domino on the head, the fence reached deeper into the head than I’d recalled, and it held the cutter away from the head by close to 1/2″. I quickly cut another piece of maple the same thickness as I’d used for the lip, and taped it to the inside surface of the head, so it was in the same plane as the lip. Now the Domino’s fence could ride on the lip and the new piece, allowing the Domino’s face to reach the head. I did have to adjust the depth from the fence to the cutter, from what I would use on the leg, but it was easy enough to sight in by eye since there are two spring-loaded pins that are centered with the cutter.

 

The spacer I used to allow the Domino's fence to sit on the lip, while staying parallel to the main body.

The spacer I used to allow the Domino’s fence to sit on the lip, while staying parallel to the main body.

 

I set the Domino’s width-of-cut knob to the most narrow, for the holes I made in the head, while I set this setting to the middle choice, for the holes in the leg. This allows for slight mis-alignments, and still end up with a viable piece. If you choose the most narrow selection for both pieces, and you don’t hit your marks perfectly, the piece may not even go together. There is really no play when this setting is selected on both parts! Remember this if you ever buy or use a Domino!

 

Showing the difference between the exact fit on the upper (head) piece, and the elongated holes on the leg.

Showing the difference between the exact fit on the upper (head) piece, and the elongated holes on the leg.

 

I used two #8 Dominos that were 50mm long, which gave plenty of strength, and there was still enough room between each Domino to stay strong. To glue up the pieces, I always make sure I’m ready to roll as soon as I apply the glue. You don’t want the Dominos to swell and not fit into their holes. After applying yellow glue to one half of a Domino, I knocked it into one of the holes in the head (the holes that are the exact size for the Domino, and always the first to receive the Dominos), and repeated on the second Domino. Almost immediately I applied glue to the other end of both Dominos and tapped the head so the Dominos seated into the leg. If the head is off to one side a bit, just tap it back into alignment, but do it before the glue wants to seize. I placed the head/leg unit into a parallel jaw clamp, snugged it down, and wiped away all glue squeeze out.

 

Dominos installed into the holes in the head first, using Titebond original glue.

Dominos installed into the holes in the head first, using Titebond original glue.

 

Head is glued and clamped to leg.

Head is glued and clamped to leg.

 

After the glue dried, I checked the contact lip to see how it’s surface looked. There was a slight crown towards the center of it’s length, which I planed away very quickly. I intentionally created a very slight spring joint, so it was most hollow in the center, and gradually working out to each end. This will allow the vise to hold the saw blades very securely.

After comparing the new head with the remaining old head, I decided I wasn’t going to be happy with replacing just one, so I did exactly the same thing for the other leg. On the second piece, I decided to use the Domino again, but this time as soon as I had the final shape of the main head. It made it easier to have a flat face for the Domino’s fence to reference against. Besides applying the lip to the head after using the Domino, everything else went pretty much the same as on the first, so it was just repetition.

After bringing both head/leg units to the same level, I cut some suede leather for the inside of each jaw. I applied a light coating of contact cement onto both pieces of leather, and onto the mating surfaces of the jaws, and then waited for them to dry to the level the adhesive maker advised (25-40 minutes on my product, but if too much time lapses, another coat is required to re-activate the product). For those who’ve not used contact cement, this is the normal protocol. You apply the recently dried pieces, and apply pressure which activates a very strong bond. Then it was just a matter of trimming away the slight overhang I included in my pieces, so all the clamping surfaces would have coverage.

 

Suede leather laid out on some waxed paper, so the contact cement won't get on my bench top.

Suede leather laid out on some waxed paper, so the contact cement won’t get on my bench top.

 

Leather applied to lip, using a large dowel to apply pressure.

Leather applied to lip, using a large dowel to apply pressure.

 

Sueded leather trimmed to match head shape.

Sueded leather trimmed to match head shape.

 

I was extremely pleased with both how nice the new heads for the saw vise turned out, and how well they interacted with the saws. I would highly suggest making a saw vise, but if you don’t trust that you can make that happen, then buy one. It is easy enough to learn the basics of saw sharpening, and there are at least a couple of good DVDs on the subject that can accelerate your learning curve. It is great to learn how to sharpen all of your tools, which keeps the tools at home, rather than sending them out for sharpening and waiting.

 

Completed saw vise held in my bench vise.

Completed saw vise held in my bench vise.

 

Finished saw vise holding Lie-Nielsen dovetail saw.

Finished saw vise holding Lie-Nielsen dovetail saw.

 

Thank you for stopping by to check out my article. I hope this might help you make one, too. As always, please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 

Lee Laird

 

Leather for cylinders – How?

Posted by is9582 on March 11, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , ,

I have two of the screwdrivers that are offered by Lie-Nielsen Toolworks, the No. 4 which is the stubby straight blade used on the chip breaker’s screw, and the No. 2 which is another stubby used on the split nuts on Lie-Nielsen’s hand saws (I’ve found it doesn’t fit all of my vintage saws, but […]

Better leather protection?

Posted by is9582 on January 19, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , ,

I posted a Tweet yesterday that had some shaped leather, and a few tools, on a leather-working board from the 1960’s. It’s interesting how different certain items can look, especially when they are in their basic 2-D form (even though the leather of course has it’s thickness, making it 3-D, I’m referring to the flat nature), […]

Pony gets leather

Posted by is9582 on January 13, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , ,

I finally found the time to apply some leather to the heads of my Stitching Pony. I was originally planning to use some of the thicker leather I knew I had on hand, but ran across some that was at least twice, and probably closer to 4 times more thin. I first measured out my […]