First page of the Auriou rasp archive.

Auriou vs Bailey, hmmm

Posted by is9582 on March 4, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Not long ago I was shifting from flattening the face side of my massive Soft Maple boards (8 1/2″ W x 3 3/4″ D x 75″ L), to one of the edge faces. On one board both of the edge faces were about equal in perceived work, as each had some twist and similar nasty rough characteristic. Many times I’d grab my old Bailey #6 hand plane set up with a decently cambered iron, and start with the iron way out there, just to expedite the process, as I hate just getting a whisker or two on a pass, at least at this stage. Oh, and I am talking about wood that I purchased that is basically rough, to the point where it has some fuzzy all over.

On this board, I reached for my #6 and I’m really not sure why my hand re-directed to my 9-grain Auriou Rasp, which is my medium grit, as I also have a 5-grain for really heavy stuff and a 15-grain model makers for the super fine work (Auriou rasps 1-grain – 4-grain are intended for working stone, while 5-grain – 15-grain are good for wood).

 

Here is the flat side of my  9-grain Auriou Rasp, on the rough edge face of the board.

Here is the flat side of my 9-grain Auriou Rasp, on the rough edge face of the board.

 

From my perspective, the far right corner of my board was elevated, as was the near left corner, as you’d expect when you have some wind/twist. I stood the board on it’s opposite side, with a wedge under one corner, to keep it from rocking (or at least too bad). I grabbed the 9-grain Auriou with it’s handle in my right hand and the tip in my left, and held it in an almost 45-degree position with my left hand leading the way. As I touched the wood, I tried to keep both of my hands at a similar level from the floor, and started near the far end of the board. Since I already knew the high area was on the right, it was easy to use that to confirm I was keeping my hands fairly level, as I expected to see wood removed on the right and nothing on the left, and the area removed shouldn’t slope to the right.

Since I’d never tried using my Auriou like this before, I made a couple of passes and then stopped to see if it was worth continuing, or if I was just wasting my energy. Surprisingly, this medium-grit rasp was rapidly bringing the high sections down, and as is somewhat usual for Auriou, it was leaving a very decent texture to the surface. I guess what I’m trying to say is that it wasn’t chewing it up and/or ripping it to shreds! With the positive results, I really got into it and gradually worked my way to the other end of the board.

 

Here is the same tool and board, and showing the progress from 2 or 3 passes with the rasp.

Here is the same tool and board, and showing the progress (see the red arrows) from 2 or 3 passes with the rasp.

 

After the I had all of the major high areas lowered down, I shifted over to my #6 hand plane, with it set at a much more reasonable bite, and rapidly completed this edge face. When I was done, I wondered if I might should’ve tried bringing in the 5-grain Auriou, but that bad boy was probably overkill, at least for this level of stock removal.

 


 

For those who haven’t yet had the chance to use any of the Auriou line of rasps, I’ll share a tip that I found during my time with these tools. I think my first tendency with a rasp (maybe just because I’m a guy, but I can’t say for sure) is to lean into it while applying pressure, to get the wood out of the way. While this tactic will certainly remove wood briskly, the overall surface can seem like a chainsaw hit it. I’ve found that using a light touch on the downward force, and controlled strokes can still rapidly remove wood, but ends up leaving a much better surface. This seems to go for any of the Auriou rasps I’ve used (the three I listed are all the cabinet maker’s shape, with one flat side and one that is curved from side-to-side, but I also have a 13-grain in their handle-maker’s style, that has the same side-to-side curve, but also curves on the long axis, towards the tip), so if you buy or are lucky enough to receive as a gift, try this to get the best results from your rasps. Oh, and Auriou make their rasps as either a right-hand or a left-hand rasp, based on how the teeth of the rasp are created. If you are a right-handed person, and are using a left-handed rasp, you’ll end up roughing the surface rather than the teeth actually cutting like they are intended. Just keep that in mind if you are buying one of their rasps, whether new or used.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the information and may give it a try as well. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Lee Laird

Pony build progress

Posted by is9582 on January 7, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I just re-read the title of this post, and it sounds like I should be a mad scientist holed up in some distant castle, making lots of muhwahahaha types of evil laughter. Ok, so the last part may be somewhat true, but I digress.

After the glue dried, attaching the oak blocks to each leg, I removed the majority of the bubbly polyurethane with a spare cutter for a Stanley No. 45. Since the dried excess glue provides little resistance and easy to remove, using a cutter without a handle can make a lot of sense, and I’d hate to chip a nice chisel’s edge if there is anything hard lurking. I guess I’d rather keep my chisels safe, as they are in a sense called to do “more skilled” jobs, where this spare cutter’s range of work is limited.

 

Oak blocks attached to legs with polyurethane glue.

Oak blocks attached to legs with polyurethane glue.

 

Using a cutter from a Stanley 45, to remove most of the excess glue.

Using a cutter from a Stanley 45, to remove most of the excess glue.

 

I sketched the shaping I planned to apply to each of the oak heads, and headed over to the band saw, which makes short work of cutting curved sections. I have a 1/2″ Wood Slicer blade on my MiniMax-16, so it can make a decent arc, but nothing too tight as all blades have limits. I made a quick cuts on the outside of both heads, working back toward the leg’s thickness, and similarly on the inside surface of each.

 

First cut made at the band saw, creating the outside curve to the head.

First cut made at the band saw, creating the outside curve to the head.

 

I clamped one of the legs up in the workbench, and used a 9-grain Auriou Rasp along with my Lie-Nielsen Boggs spokeshave to blend the outer surface of the leg with the arc cut into the head. This wood was a bit “grabby” when I moved to my spokeshave, so instead of holding the tool with both hands equal distance from my chest, I’d rotate it so my right was closer to the chest than was my left. At one point it was close to being 90-degrees off of the standard axis. This skewing really tamed the wood, and while it might seem a bit odd, you should give it a try when you are having some trouble getting a clean surface from your spokeshave.

 

Legs side-by-side, one with spokeshave work, and the other straight from band saw.

Legs side-by-side, one with spokeshave work, and the other straight from band saw.

 

I had a small block of Pecan, that I placed between the two upright legs, to get a sense of the progress. I noticed the inside faces of the mating oak blocks came together on one edge, but nowhere else. Rather than just planing these faces and moving on, I decided to re-check the face sides and edges of the legs, for square. I’m not sure if my eye caught something that looked slightly out or what, but my reference surfaces weren’t actually square, even though I was sure I’d tested them religiously. Using my best square, I marked what was low/high, and planed them so they were now square. After testing the mating oak blocks again, the issue was less than earlier, but still needed a little work. While working on the contact areas, I decided to include a slight splay in the legs, rather than having them straight up and down. I grabbed my block plane and quickly had a nice consistent mating surface, when the legs were in their splayed positions.

 

Initial mockup using the actual legs and a stand-in block.

Initial mockup using the actual legs and a stand-in block.

 

I clamped the two leg/head sections in my vise, with a small gap between the two heads (taking into account the thickest leather I’d most likely work, and a wrap of thin leather I planned to add to each head), and then measured the length of the block I needed. This was longer than the block of Pecan I’d used for mockup, so I found some alternate wood for the block. It turned out I had a piece of Maple that I’d used years ago for the outside jaw of a clamping device, that had a feature I’d planned to include in this Pony, already existing. This feature was a hole through which the vise screw passed, and I planned to have optional bases I can attached to the Pony, so this was perfect. I measured around the existing hole, so it was as centered as possible, and cut the block just slightly long. This provided me the ability to fine tune and perfect the fit of the block and legs. I made my initial layout marks with pencil, and with everything where it belonged, I scored the exact location with my marking knife. As there was such a small amount I needed to remove, I put the block into my vise, and pulled out this really old and awesome paring chisel. I methodically lowered the excess wood down to my lines, which is a great technique to have in your back pocket.

 

Maple block with scored line as the target dimension.

Maple block with scored line as the target dimension.

 

IMG_2835 block face almost flat

 

I presented each leg to the block, to decide where the screws would go in, so the threads didn’t accidentally make their way into the existing attachment hole. Once I had the layout marked, I used an awl to create indentations so the drill bit wouldn’t skate around on the board. With the holes pre-drilled on each leg, it was time to attach the legs to this slightly angling block. As you may have previously experienced, if you squeeze a clamp on two outside boards, centered on an angled core (block), the block may very well slip in the direction it is most thick. To eliminate any chance this might occur at the most inopportune time, I decided the best way to handle these parts, was to clamp the block to a flat surface, and then clamp a leg both to the block and also to the flat surface. I kept the blade of a small square against the bottom of the block, and referenced the bottom of the leg to the square’s blade. With the parts solidly aligned, the clamps were brought to decent pressure, so nothing could move out of place.

 

Taking care to clamp the block and pre-drilled leg, while preparing to drive the bottom screws.

Taking care to clamp the block and pre-drilled (red arrow) leg, while keeping both in contact with square’s blade (blue arrow) ,preparing to drive the bottom screws.

 

I used some 1 1/4″ long fine Kreg screws, which are self drilling, to attach the legs to the block. With the clamps in place, the bottom two screws were the only ones accessible, so I drove those home.

 

While clamped securely, the two bottom screws were driven in place.

While clamped securely, the two bottom screws were driven in place.

 

At this point, I removed the clamp that secured the leg to the block, while leaving the other two solidly in place, and drove the other two screws in. Everything looked good, so I flipped the pieces around and clamped the second leg to the group. I repeated the same steps and after the second set of four screws were in, the Stitching Pony was extremely solid. (please note the word I used there; extremely.)

 

Extremely solid Stitching Pony.

Extremely solid Stitching Pony.

 

With the two legs attached to the block, I thought it prudent to give this little beast a test. Hmmmm, well, uhm…, I said this was extremely solid, right? Well, it is so solid, that I when I tried to flex the heads away from each other, I got the sense (was that a crack I heard?) that I was going to break one of the legs (or strip out a screw), before it would flex. This design is solely an amalgam of different versions I’d seen over the years, and I’ve never measured any that I’d seen, so I had no baseline how thick I should make the legs. Ok, this is really no big deal. I think this is how I learn best, by doing and finding what does and what does not work. So, what will I do to resolve this issue? I took all of the screws out of the legs, and decided I’d go a little heavier than half the current thickness, so somewhere around 60% of the original thickness. I can’t really tell you why I chose the final dimension, other than that is what looked reasonable to me. I grabbed my pencil and marked both legs, using my fingertips as a fence, so they both were approximately the same thickness. I know I could have picked up my square, and set it to a dimension, and slid it and the pencil along, making the line exactly the same distance from the inside edge, on both pieces. Some work may warrant that type of precision, but the variance in my fingertip approach, is so small as not to matter.

I took the legs back over to the band saw and cut just proud of my marks, resawing both legs. From there it was back to the vise in my workbench, and hand planing the outside face until all the saw marks were gone, and of course keeping it square to both edges. I start with the plane set fairly deep, as you are riding on the tops of little mountains, when you look at the wavy sawn surface from the band saw. This expedites getting the junk out of the way and as I start to see signs that I’m cutting additional fibers (if you ask how you’ll know when you are cutting more fibers, you’ll start to feel the plane becoming harder to push across the work), I wind the plane’s iron back in so I’m taking lighter shavings, and don’t get the iron stuck into the wood. After both legs were again smooth on their outside faces, I again blended the face/head region into a pleasing curve, and sanded all of the hard edges.

 

Planing the outside surface, after resawing both legs, balancing thin enough to flex, but still have strength.

Planing the outside surface, after resawing both legs, balancing thin enough to flex, but still have strength.

 

I re-attached both legs, with all four screws on each side, and tested how the Pony behaved. This time I could separate the heads enough to slip a double-thickness of leather in between and the Pony held the leather with a decent amount of pressure, without any extra outside clamping. This was a great test, which proved I didn’t need to remake the legs (if they weren’t strong enough to hold the leather) or remove any more wood (if the wood still wouldn’t flex enough to get work between the jaws).

 

The Pony re-assembled after I reduced the thickness of both legs.

The Pony re-assembled after I reduced the thickness of both legs.

 

Testing the Pony with two pieces of leather, of the thickness I will normally use.

Testing the Pony with two pieces of leather, of the thickness I will normally use.

 

I still planned to add some thin leather to both heads, so they won’t scratch or otherwise hurt the show surface on the work, which will take up a little of the existing gap between the heads. I decided I’d still add a bolt through both legs, that will allow a bit more controllable pressure on the work, as is needed. I chose the placement for the bolt, initially by squeezing the two legs together at different points, using my hand. The location of this bolt is another balancing act. You want as deep a throat as possible to handle a wide range of work, but as you move the bolt farther down from the heads, it’s influence on the heads is reduced. I finally chose what looked like a decent location, and marked across both legs. I set a divider that reached from the edge of a leg, to the approximate center point, and used it to make the initial impression in the legs.

 

Leg marked (red arrow) with awl, so the drill bit won't drift.

Leg marked (red arrow) with awl, so the drill bit won’t drift.

 

The bolt I bought for the Pony is a 3/8″ – 5″, which has a bit of extra length, as I got it before reducing the thickness of the legs. I planned to drill a clearance hole of 13/32″, but it can be hard to feel whether the center point on the larger bits, is staying in contacting with the small impression. The wood bits I have are from DeWalt and my 13/32″ has a center section that is around 7/64″ wide, so I tossed my 7/64″ bit into my hand-crank drill, and made a hole that was about 1/8″ deep. This prevented the bit from shifting away from my intended location.

The wood I used for the Pony’s legs is extremely hard, which can also translate that it is brittle. I knew this wood would blow out something awful if I didn’t support the rear of each leg, while drilling. I located an off-cut that was thicker than the opening between the two legs, so I held the block against the inside of one leg, while scribing from the inside of the second leg. I grabbed my Lie-Nielsen cross cut saw and sawed down the line, which created a shoulder, deep enough so the support block would make contact all across the area the drill would remove.

 

I created a backer block that fit snuggly into the slightly angled opening of the legs, to limit chip-out when drilling.

I created a backer block that fit snuggly into the slightly angled opening of the legs, to limit chip-out when drilling.

 

I rotated the Pony with it’s support block, and held a Pony leg in the vise, while slowly drilling through the legs. The first hole went exceedingly well, and provided a flawless hole.

 

First leg drilled, for tensioning bolt.

First leg drilled, for tensioning bolt.

 

As the bit exited the rear of the second leg, even with solid support, it still splintered some. As it didn’t completely clear the wood from the hole either, I used a very thin chisel to reach down through the first hole, to cleanly cut the excess in the second hole. It didn’t take long to clean it up and have the bolt feeding through both holes as intended.

 

Bolt installed with washers and wing-nut,

Bolt installed with washers and wing-nut,

 

After removing the bolt, I used a card scraper to clean up all of the surfaces, which does a great job if you have a decently tuned up scraper.

At this point, I have a secondary board I can attach directly to the main Stitching Pony, via a bolt through the board and the hole in the block. It’s unclear how much I’ll utilize this aspect, as I can easily hold the lower section of the Pony in the jaws of my vise (at either bench), which is holding the front and rear open face of the lower block, not the legs themselves.

Here is the Stitching Pony all cleaned up, but just waiting for the small leather adornments on the contact surfaces of both heads. I’ll pick up some contact cement the next time I’m out and it’ll ready to rock and roll. At present, I can just slip a thin piece of leather between the jaws and the working leather, if I can’t wait to get after stitching some leather together.

 

Pony rotated slightly, to hopefully capture details better.

Pony rotated slightly, to hopefully capture details better.

 

Thanks as always for stopping and checking out the article. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Lee Laird

Organizing some chisels

Posted by is9582 on December 12, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , ,

As I’ve mentioned at earlier times, I love chisels, which translates into quantity. I’ve been working to plane some more slabs of the Soft Maple, for my workbench top rebuild, and some of my chisels weren’t close at hand in a functional manner, but still showing their presence, if you know what I mean. I […]

Moxon build – BenchCrafted hardware

Posted by is9582 on July 22, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve had this hardware for a number of months now, but as many of the regular readers probably know, I’ve just had too much on my plate to make it happen. I was stoked to have some time yesterday, so I got after it. I like to reuse wood that might have some visual imperfections, […]

Wall storage – continuation

Posted by is9582 on June 25, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ok, so in the last storage article, I left you with four of my bench planes securely stored on the plywood that I will mount above my work bench. I started looking at the tools I use regularly, to see what I wanted to go on the board, and where. On the lowest portion of […]