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Knife making tool you make

Posted by is9582 on July 7, 2016 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ok, sorry again for the lack of recent posts, but my last post hopefully informed everyone as to why I’ve been away from the site.

I bought some more material for knife blades, even though it wasn’t quite as thick, and had a different “feature”. The blanks I bought had some holes in them, and the location of the holes presented an issue, where I would need to either make the tang much more narrow or include a section of a hole. I decided on the latter, which had some positive aspect (stronger), and not quite negative, but I suppose challenging (tang shape other than rectangular adds some extra work) aspect to it.

 

Knife blade blank before grinding/sharpening, with part of a circle (red arrows) as part of the tang.

Knife blade blank before grinding/sharpening, with part of a circle (red arrows) as part of the tang.

 

As I do regularly now, I placed the tang of a blade on the inside of one half of the handle, and trace around the tang with a pencil. As this batch of knives is a little bit smaller than the most recent knife I wrote about (here, in case you haven’t yet read about it), the tang isn’t as wide. Both the width of the tang, as well as the shape (with the small portion of a circle), changed my work strategy a bit. On the last knife, the tang was wide enough to comfortably use the standard iron in my Lie-Nielsen No. 71 (Large Router Plane) to excavate the waste wood, and providing a flat and level “floor” which the tang rests upon.

The smaller tang on the current knives is too narrow to effectively use the No. 71, unless I was to shift to one of the small blades made for the Lie-Nielsen No. 271 (Small Router Plane), but I currently only have the 3/32″ Pointed Tip blade which wouldn’t really be very efficient. They do offer a 1/4″ Square Tip blade, and with the area nearest the hole/circle pinching in to even more narrow width, it would still fit nicely.

I don’t presently have a 1/4″ Square Tip blade, for my No. 71, so it was time to improvise. I recall seeing an old home-made tool, that used a small block of wood for its body, and a narrow chisel as the blade, to create a router plane. I quickly went through my off-cuts and found a small piece of white oak (this could have been a section of 2 x 4, or other softwood, as well), and an old Stanley chisel. I made sure the chosen chisel would fit into the tang recess areas, and then compared the chisel’s dimensions with my drill bits, and made sure the bit was just slightly smaller than the chisel. On a regular router plane, the blade is made from an “L” shaped piece of steel, and the cutting portion of the blade is held so there is a clearance angle between the heal of the blade and the work surface. Knowing this, I held the chisel I planned to use as my router plane’s blade, and when I saw a similar clearance, I set my adjustable angle gauge so it mimicked the angle of the chisel’s shaft. I held the angle gauge up against the side of the oak body, making sure to pay attention to where the blade would come through, which I wanted to have just behind the leading edge of the body. After determining where the blade would exit, I again used the angle gauge to locate the entry point for the blade, and the drill bit. Before I started drilling, I placed the angle gauge off to the side of the entry point, so I could use it as a visual guide to make sure I drilled the hole at the correct angle, similar to what Peter Galbert does when drilling into his Windsor seat blanks.

With the hole drilled (which is the basic path the chisel will follow), I used the same chisel planned as the blade, to remove some of the excess wood, but also used some narrow Japanese chisels to speed up the process. I worked mostly from the top side of the body, but as it got closer to coming through the bottom of the body, I sighted in a few well placed strikes with my most narrow Japanese chisel, to create an opening much closer to the size of the chisel. This helped prevent the wood breaking out, when the main chisel first came through the sole, and the location of the smaller chisel cuts made sure I didn’t create a loose fit. The chisel/blade will only advance with a firm strike, which gives me confidence the “blade” won’t shift either in or out, during use.

 

Router plane sitting on knife handle half, with blade in the tang groove.

Router plane sitting on knife handle half, with blade in the tang groove.

 

Router plane front pivoted up slightly to show blade projecting (green arrow), while resting on handle blank (red arrow).

Router plane front pivoted up slightly to show blade projecting (green arrow), while resting on handle blank (red arrow).

 

Up close of router plane, blade (green arrow), and narrowing of tang groove (red arrow) where the wood shape matches that of the tang (circle).

Up close of router plane, blade (green arrow), and narrowing of tang groove (red arrow) where the wood shape matches that of the tang (circle).

 

Router plane resting on its side, to show angle of blade through body, and you can just see the mouth (red arrow).

Router plane resting on its side, to show angle of blade through body, and you can just see the mouth (red arrow).

 

After I had the blade all the way through, I traced out an area surrounding the blade, which I removed so it wouldn’t jam up as quickly.

 

Sole of the router plane, with additional wood removed around the blade to help reduce jamming.

Sole of the router plane, with additional wood removed around the blade to help reduce jamming.

 

Router plane with blade inserted, showing the mouth area recess.

Router plane with blade inserted, showing the mouth area recess.

 

Using the new tool

After I chiseled away bulk wood in the tang-waste area of the knife handle, I used this new tool to make sure all of the tang area was the same depth. When I shifted to the second half of the knife handle, I decided to see if I could get the tool to behave decently, with it already set to full depth. I simply rotated the whole tool up on it’s leading edge, which raised the cutter away from the wood. I slowly pivoted the tool down until it was lightly cutting, and went over the whole tang area. I pivoted the tool’s sole down closer to the work, removing material until even again, and repeated until I was at final depth. This made for a fairly rapid process, without the need to stop and change the projection of the blade.

While this purpose-made tool worked decently, I still prefer the blade presentation the adjustable metal router planes provide, as I noticed more chattering on my new tool. One thing I did, after I was finishing up, was to take another similarly small chisel and use it as a scraper. I held it almost vertical, then tilt it slightly towards myself (around 15 degrees), making sure the flat back of the chisel was facing me, and pull this “scraper” towards me, to take super-controlled “cuts”. You really don’t need to create a hook on a chisel’s cutting edge that you put into use as a scraper, and I think you’ll find it amazing just how much control you have, and how fine the resulting surface is. One must, and this is for both the router plane build as well as when using it for scraping: make sure your chisel is sharp! It truly makes all the difference.

Thank you for stopping by to check out the article, and I hope you will find the information useful. As always, please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Lee Laird

@LeeLairdWoodworking (Instagram)

@LeeLairdWW (Twitter)

 

Life can get in the way of article writing

Posted by is9582 on July 7, 2016 with No Comments

This post is solely to share why I’ve been absent. Unfortunately, even when one is retired, life’s responsibilities are still chewing on you and that’s exactly what played at least a part. My son moved to West Virginia, and with him moving out of a condo we own, it was finally time to go through all of the items that were stored in the second bedroom. And did I mention this condo is on the 3rd floor, AND there is no elevator?? With the nice Texas heat, and my continued rehab from my last back surgery, and it took quite a bit longer prepping the condo to the point where we could lease it. First time in a long time that we are again empty nesters, so neither of my “assistants” were around to run the loads up and down the stairs or simply to give me a hand. The condo is now prepped and the next lease is just about to begin, so hopefully this will get me closer to being regular in my writing again!! For those that haven’t noticed my previous posts where I shared my InstaGram account @LeeLairdWoodworking as well as my Twitter account @LeeLairdWW, you can always check these to see if I’ve posted anything, as I can sometimes post a quickie on one of these even if I don’t have time to write a full article.

I have an almost complete post regarding making a useful tool, so please check back later this afternoon or evening. I’ll do my best to have the article up shortly.

Thank you for stopping by.

Lee Laird