Site Video Player corrected – details

Posted by is9582 on September 20, 2016 with No Comments as , , , , , , , ,

Unfortunately the videos on my site were all automatically set with the auto-play switch set to on, and I couldn’t seem to get to the level needed in which to change this. I know this created a wall of audio with my vocals talking on top of one another. This was very frustrating and I’m sorry anyone had to endure this problem. For those that went through and clicked the pause button, and continued to stick around, I’m very grateful!

Last night I updated the video player on my site to Spider 1.5.18, which makes the handling of the auto-play easy and understandable. Beyond letting my audience know this is now resolved and all videos loaded since Friday 9/16/2016 (at this point) and any future videos will play only when the user clicks on the video play button, I thought I’d provide an extremely limited how-to for anyone using this specific video player.

The Spider Video Player 1.5.18 has large number of parameters that the site admin can control to (hopefully) make the end user’s experience better. To actually control the mass of parameters (of course including auto-play), from the Side-bar menu, under the Video Player heading, choose/click Themes. This opens a window that allows you to either select one of the auto-generated themes, as well as the “Add a Theme” button towards the upper left of the window.

 

The Theme selection/addition/deletion window, with the

The Theme selection/addition/deletion window, with the “Add a Theme” button and my theme surrounded by a red line.

 

Choose/click this button and as you probably expect, you get to name your new theme, but don’t forget to scroll down the page, as this is where all of the detailed control is located. Much of this control is via choosing either “yes” or “no” radio buttons, but others like the volume of video/audio are controlled via a slider you drag from 0-100. The two screen shots below, are just some of the controls provided, which is why I decided to focus attention on the most important areas, related to this discussion.

 

Make sure to name and save your new theme.

Make sure to name and save your new theme.

 

This is the bottom section of the Theme Creation page, where I drew a red oval around the auto-play switch.

This is the bottom section of the Theme Creation page, where I drew a red oval around the auto-play switch.

 

Some or all of this may be child’s play for most reading this, but hopefully it will assist someone else that was having difficulty with the control of their videos.

Thank you for checking out this article/tip. Please let me know if you have any questions or comment.

 

Lee Laird

@LeeLairdWoodworking – InstaGram

@LeeLairdWW – Twitter

Carving Knife Sharpening Supplement

Posted by is9582 on September 19, 2016 with No Comments as , , , , , , , ,

I decided it would be a good idea to make at least one last video relating to the subject of how I sharpen Carving Knives See here for the original article. I always do my best to choose my words so the reader can envision what I’m talking about, but I know that some people are more visual learners. With this in mind, I made a relatively short video this morning and just posted it on Youtube. Just in case the player below doesn’t get along with your viewing system, the quick-link for the new video is: https://youtu.be/QLukWL0wC5Y

 

 


 

There is one thing I want to include, that I didn’t record in the video. Obviously for a knife (or any tool) to be sharp, both sides of the blade must be equally honed, as whichever side is less refined will be the limiting factor in actually getting the tool sharp. Most will have one side of the blade that is the most easy to hone, and its just a matter of finding what works best for you, when working on the “other” side of the blade. You can either leave the actual blade pointing in the same direction as when working the first side, and just flip the knife physically over, but that puts your finger in potential danger (either on one side or the other, in the flipping scenario), as the cutting edge will face them on one of the sides. The other option (which I use) is to hold the handle on the first pass, so the tip of the blade is pointing to my right, with the cutting edge upward. When I work the second side, I rotate my wrist so the tip of the blade is now pointing to my left, while again keeping the cutting edge upward. This is a safety net of sorts, since I might move forward slightly with the hand holding the sharpening media, and even if I were to move so far forward that my rear fingers contacted the blade, they would only touch the spine of the blade.

 

I hope this helps clarify how I’m sharpening blades with a hollow-grind. As I referenced in the first article, I use a similar process when I am honing other blades that no longer have a hollow-grind remaining, or have flat bevels from the maker. Let me know if there is anyone that is interested in me making a video where I show the steps and specific techniques I use on a knife with flat bevels.

 

Thank you for checking out this article. Please let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 

Lee Laird

@LeeLairdWoodworking – InstaGram

@LeeLairdWW – Twitter

How I sharpen my carving knives

Posted by is9582 on September 16, 2016 with No Comments as , , , , , , , , ,

In one of my previous articles, I briefly touched on sharpening this type knife, but I wanted to get into greater detail so others can replicate this process, if they desire.

 

After shaping the blade with different tools, it looks like a knife in form, but is still just as thick at what will be the cutting edge, as it is at the spine. At this point I head to my Baldor 1725 rpm grinder and remove material on both sides of the blade, as opposed to a knife that only has a bevel on one side, while the other side stays flat.

 

When it comes off of the grinder, it can cut you if you were to run your finger along the blade, but it is not a useful sharp, in my opinion. The grinding wheel is round, and as the side of the blade has metal removed by the wheel, the shape is called a hollow grind. If you can imagine if you were to take a block of clay and press it against a static grinding wheel, when you pull it away you’d see a curved surface. This is ultimately what happens as you present the knife to the grinder, even though it takes more time to take on this shape, as the wheels must gradually abrade away the metal. Sorry if this part is getting too deep, as I just want to make sure you understand the shape of the knife’s cutting edge. On to the “good” part.

 

With the hollow grind shape, when you want to sharpen the cutting edge, the base of the bevel works with you to make it easier to know you are working at the correct angle. When you put a flat surface (similar to a ruler) up against the bevel, you can feel when both the cutting edge and base of the bevel are both touching. If you had a flat bevel or a convex bevel from the base to the cutting edge, it can be very difficult to actually feel that you are in correct alignment, especially when the bevel is very small.

 

This is a recent blade I made, and it is already sharpened, and you can see the polished tracks at the cutting edge and the base of the bevel.

This is a recent blade I made, and it is already sharpened, and you can see the polished tracks at the cutting edge and the base of the bevel.

 

This is the Dia-Fold diamond hone, and the handles swing so they close around the hone, or open to provide a handle.

This is the Dia-Fold diamond hone, and the handles swing so they close around the hone, or open to provide a handle.

 

When I begin to sharpen, immediately after grinding, I use my Dia-Fold diamond sharpening hone.  I’ve owned this for 20+ years, and it started out as a Coarse hone, but over the years the diamonds have worn somewhat, and I believe it is now more in the Fine range of grits. If I had to try to pin down a specific grit, I’d see it as similar to a 1000-grit stone. I hold the blade in one hand and the Dia-Fold in the other, and feel for the hone to touch the two high areas, the cutting edge and the base of the bevel. With it correctly in position, I slide it down the knife until I reach the end of the cutting surface. I try to keep it consistent, by working each side in an alternating pattern, but you can also just work each side the same number of strokes, which will provide a similar result. When the knife comes off of the grinding wheel, I can tell when it is finished by the burr along one side of the cutting edge. This burr can be fairly significant from the grinder, so besides working with the first hone until both sides show signs of the grit all the way to the cutting edge, you also work until the burr is either removed, or diminished in size. At this point, I move to the next stage.

 

Japanese water stones in 4000-grit and 8000-grit, along the small water bowl I use with them.

Japanese water stones in 4000-grit and 8000-grit, along the small water bowl I use with them.

 

The 4000-grit Japanese water stone is used next, and they are best when used with water, as that allows the metal it removes to float off of the stone, rather than imbedding, even though it still builds up over time. If you worked the previous hone until you couldn’t feel a burr on either side of the blade, you just work with this stone until you see the change in the scratches on the cutting edge. It should change to a dull grey, with no real obvious scratch marks. When consistent on both sides of the blade, you’re ready to move on.

 

The two water stones resting in the small bowl, as I regularly use them, just missing the water.

The two water stones resting in the small bowl, as I regularly use them, just missing the water.

 

Next up is the 8000-grit Japanese water stone, and the procedure is exactly the same as the last, but I use a little less pressure as these stones can be more delicate than the 4000-grit. You still need to use water as it’s lubricant, and this time you’ll look for a nicely polished cutting edge. When both sides are complete its on to the last stage.

 

Tormek honing compound in the yellow tube. It is applied to the top section of the wood (white area) and the two black stripes are from contacting the cutting edge and bevel base at the same time.

Tormek honing compound in the yellow tube. It is applied to the top section of the wood (white area) and the two black stripes are from contacting the cutting edge and bevel base at the same time.

 

I use a honing paste that came with my Tormek T-7 sharpening system, and was included to apply on a leather covered wheel, for final honing. I’ve found I like to use this compound on a small piece of wood, that is similar in size to the Dia-Fold’s honing section. It is comfortable to hold and present to the blade, in a similar fashion. Apply the compound either directly to the wood, or put a small dab on your finger, and smear it onto the wood so there is a very thin layer in the area you plan to contact the blade. If it is too viscous, you can spray the work area of the wood with a very small amount of WD-40, which will allow it to spread easier.

 

Three potential pieces to use with the Tormek honing compound. The middle one is what I've used for the last year. Far right is one I planed and tested today; far left is a good candidate for the future.

Three potential pieces to use with the Tormek honing compound. The middle one is what I’ve used for the last year. Far right is one I planed and tested today; far left is a good candidate for the future.

 

After working both sides of the blade, and seeing they have a highly polished cutting edge, you are working sharp. I take a paper towel, or another sort of rag, and extremely carefully remove any excess compound that has transferred to the blade. The low area in the hollow grind is especially noticeable for catching the compound. When you do this the first time, make sure you start towards the thicker part of the blade, and move out past the cutting edge. Do not move back towards the blade in the same manner or you will likely cut yourself. Just raise up away from the blade and circle back down to hit another area. After you’ve gotten more comfortable, you might do as I will, and “pinch” the blade while removing the compound remnants. If you do not feel totally confidant in this, just stick to the original method, as it is not important to go any faster.

After using the knife to carve wood, you will likely come to a point where it doesn’t seem to cut quite as well. As long as you haven’t hit any nails, or staples in the wood, you can probably get away with just re-doing the Tormek compound process, to refreshen the blade. If this doesn’t seem to do the job, you can go back as far as you deem necessary, potentially all the way to the Dia-Fold. If you touch-up the blade regularly, rather than waiting until it is quite obvious the cut is not as good, you may find the Tormek compound is all you need to use to retain a very sharp knife for a long time.

As time passes, and the knife honed over and over, the hollow grind shape will slowly disappear. This will likely require you to change your process slightly, as the reference “feel” of the hollow grind will no longer be there to guide you. At this point I apply black sharpie to the bevel of the knife, and pay close attention while I work, to see when I am removing the black from the full bevel. I lock my wrist at that angle, and work until I have a consistent scratch pattern again. All of the other steps are the same, except you may need to use the sharpie for each stage of honing.

I hope this, along with the included videos below help all the owners of my knives to continue carving for years to come. Please don’t hesitate to let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 


 

 


Lee Laird

Highland Woodworking - Fine Tools Since 1978

 

Can I control jump stitches?

Posted by is9582 on August 24, 2016 with No Comments as , , , , , , , , , ,

In this article I’m focusing primarily on Designer’s Gallery Creator 3, which is the software that we use with our embroidery machine, but I expect other digitizing programs will at least behave similarly.

I went back and was looking at some of the earliest projects I made with our software, and as I was somewhat green, there were some obvious (at least now) things that would make the output much more clean. When you draw an area and close the outline, if you choose any option that creates stitches (line, fill, satin column, …) a green bow-tie (begin point) and a red bow-tie (end point) are automatically generated by the software. What is the relevance of these two points? Lets look at a flower (looks like something a 1st grader might draw, but I wanted to make this simple) that I just quickly drew for this discussion.

Notice the three red dashed lines, with an arrow pointing towards each. These will each be a jump stitch when embroidered.

Notice the three red dashed lines, with an arrow pointing towards each. These will each be a jump stitch when embroidered.

 

In the screen capture above, there are red dashed lines (indication of jump stitches) between the petals. The first petal that will stitch out is the upper left (which is controllable by the designer), leading around the petals clockwise. After the upper left petal is stitched (filled by control), the machine will leap from to the upper right petal, and begin stitching the second petal. The thread between the petals is still connected (unless you have one of the newer embroidery machines, that will clip the jump stitches for you), even though not stitched into the fabric between the petals. The red and green bow-ties I mentioned earlier are about to make more sense.

 

The blue arrow is pointing towards the green bow-tie and the magenta arrow towards the red bow-tie. These are the begin (green) and end (red) points of the stitching for this object.

The blue arrow is pointing towards the green bow-tie and the magenta arrow towards the red bow-tie. These are the begin (green) and end (red) points of the stitching for this object.

 

In the screen capture above, I clicked onto the upper left petal object, and it shows additional details, including the red and green bow-ties, even though they are a bit difficult to see when on top of each other.

 

I moved the red bow-tie to a position where I can either eliminate any jump, or on other projects, want to minimize the amount or placement of a jump.

I moved the red bow-tie to a position where I can either eliminate any jump, or on other projects, want to minimize the amount or placement of a jump.

 

Above you can see that I moved the red bow-tie to the small tip of the upper left petal, and by doing this, the red dashed line that was originally showing from the upper part of the left petal, is now drawn from the red bow-tie’s new location. So, the red bow-tie is important as this is where the machine shifts from the completed upper left petal, to the upper right petal (or whatever is next in your design). Now lets see what we can do to completely eliminate the red dashed line from the first petal to the second.

 

The upper right petal has the two bow-ties in a location where there is no way to prevent a jump stitch.

The upper right petal has the two bow-ties in a location where there is no way to prevent a jump stitch.

 

With the green bow-tie moved to a position up close to the red bow-tie from the previous section, will eliminate any jump stitch.

With the green bow-tie moved to a position up close to the red bow-tie from the previous section, the jump stitch from the first to the second petal is eliminated.

 

Ok, so by moving the green bow-tie on the upper right petal, down to the narrow tip of this petal, with it’s location basically against the red bow-tie of the first petal, there is no longer a jump stitch between these two petals.

 

With both the red and green bow-ties at tip of the petal, there is no longer a red dashed line from the upper left petal to the upper right petal.

With both the red and green bow-ties at tip of the petal, there is no longer a red dashed line from the upper left petal to the upper right petal.

 

Notice by moving the red bow-tie from the second petal down to the narrow point of it’s petal, we are prepping to remove the next jump stitch, which is going to the lower right petal. To finish the changes to the flower, so there are no jump stitches which looks better and requires less work to clean up, I moved the two bow-ties for the remaining petals so they were at the narrow point for their respective sections. This will allow the machine to stitch most efficiently, flowing from petal to petal, with no unnecessary movements or extra thread used.

 

After I adjusted the start/end points for the four petals, there are no longer any red dashed lines, meaning no jump stitches.

After I adjusted the start/end points for the four petals, there are no longer any red dashed lines, meaning no jump stitches.

 

The capture above is of a perfectly clean design, where there are no jump stitches. If you plan the order of what you are stitching, and utilize your control of the two bow-ties, you can make your projects as nice as possible. Just so you know, you can’t always get rid of every jump stitch, unless you change threads between every object!

Additionally, planning the order you stitch, when you have multiple objects with the same color, can save you a lot of thread changes, and time.

Let me know if you have any questions or comments. Thank you for stopping by.

Lee Laird

Twitter   @LeeLairdWW

InstaGram @LeeLairdWoodworking

Machine Embroidery software tip

Posted by is9582 on August 21, 2016 with No Comments as , , , , , , , ,

We own Designer’s Gallery Creator 3, which is a fairly new software we use to digitize what we want to embroider on our machine. We have a Baby Lock embroidery machine, but this software can save files in a range of formats, suitable for a wide audience of machines.

I have used graphics design programs for a very long time, and my first really good one that we purchased was Photoshop 2.5 (yep, it was current when we purchased it, so it’s been a long time). In many ways the new Creator software felt comfortable very quickly, as it almost seemed I was using some features from graphics design.

Ok, so I just wanted to lay a little background, but I’ll get on with the specifics. Recently, I was asked to create a couple of designs, and besides the graphical nature, also had some text that followed a curve. Creator has some built-in fonts (not including the True Type fonts that are also used by the rest of the computer), with a number of features to help the designer make some cool products, including text on a curve.

The fonts in this section of the program stitch out beautifully, but each has size restraints. Some may not work below 25mm, while another may go down to 7mm or even 5mm, as it’s smallest. Unfortunately, the font I chose, based on the size of my design, wouldn’t follow as tight of a curve as I needed.

To combat this, I ended up creating and rotating each letter, so it looked as if the text was just following the curve in my design. This is not a hard thing to accomplish, but can be a bit tedious. I’ve had more than a couple times where I got close to the end of the text, only to find the text going beyond the cutoff point. Then all of the letters must be shifted and adjusted, to again follow the curve of the design.

**Tip: During the above work, I got through about 8 – 10 letters and noticed each new letter had a more rough outline, compared to the original refined look when I started. I started digging in the setting to see if there was something I’d accidentally done to cause this issue. After going back and forth a couple times, I noticed one setting, Satin Density, was different on the beginning smooth letters compared to the most recent.

 

Look at the outline of the large

Look at the outline of the large “N” and notice all of the ridges all around the letter. Also look at the value under “Satin Density”, which is currently 9.

 

Now look at the large

Now look at the much smoother large “N” inside the red outlined box, as well as the value of 4 for Satin Density in the setting inside the blue box.

 

I decided to change the Satin Density setting from 9 to 4 on one of the rough letters, and sure enough, the letter was again the beautiful looking font. I went back through all of the text, and I noticed the first couple of letters had the Satin Density set at 4, where the next few were set at 5, and so on until it reached 9. As far as I know, I didn’t change any settings that would cause the non-static value in this field.

When I first noticed the difference in what I was seeing on the computer screen, I thought it might just be the software displaying a lower resolution version to save resources. After I found the changing values for the Satin Density, I was glad I hadn’t spent the time to stitch out the design, only to see a range of differing letter refinement.

If you have Creator, and use the built-in fonts (or add-ins that you’ve purchased), keep an eye on the basic look of the chosen font, just in case this isn’t an isolated issue. It took a little extra time to go back into each letter and adjust this setting, but I’d much rather do that rather than spin my wheels generating a design I can’t use, wasting thread and whatever fabric/item on which you are embroidering.

I hope this article is helpful and might save you some time. Thanks for stopping by, and please let me know if you have any question or comments.

 

Lee Laird

Twitter –  @LeeLairdWW

InstaGram – @LeeLairdWoodworking